Git

Git is a version control system that allows developers to track changes and collaborate with each other on the same code. Every single change you or your co-workers make is tracked and you can go back to different versions without interfering with each other’s work. GitHub, on the other hand, is a hosting service for git repositories. It is a great way to collaborate with others, learn new ideas, and show off the work that you have done. Overall Git and Github are powerful tools that allows developers the flexibility to save, modify, and manage all versions, past or present, of their project.

Tech Kits

Tech Kits are part of the walk-in service provided by OPIM Innovate. There are three levels of difficulty meant for different users and their experience with the different technologies. Many of the Tech Kits build off each other as you progress.

Beginner

Introducing Git and GitHub

Length: 30-60 Minutes

Description: Git is a version control system that allows developers to track changes and collaborate with each other on the same code. You can think of Git as a developer’s version of Google Docs. Every single change you or your co-workers make is tracked and you can go back to different versions without interfering with each other’s work. GitHub, on the other hand, is a hosting service for git repositories. It is a great way to collaborate with others, learn new ideas, and show off the work that you have done.

Intermediate

GitHub Desktop

Length: 30-60 Minutes

Description: In the previous tutorial, the user worked with github.com and managed all of our work from the web browser. However, more complicated projects become a hassle to handle in the browser because most of the work is happening locally on a computer. GitHub Desktop provides a user-friendly interface that allows you to connect the changes made on a computer to github.com. This way, the user can work without having to depend on your browser.

Advanced

Command Line Interface

Length: 30-60 Minutes Minutes

Description: There are a lot of different ways to use Git, as demonstrated by the previous tech kits. In this tech kit, the user will be using Git on the command line interface. A command-line interface sends commands to a computer program in the form of lines of text, rather than via buttons for example. The program which handles the interface is called a command-line interpreter or command-line processor. The command line is the only place you can run all Git commands — many other GUIs only implement a subset of Git functionality for simplicity.

Projects

Resources