3D Printing

3D printing is a quickly emerging technology in the manufacturing industry. With 3D printing, manufacturers are able to print parts at a fraction of the cost of traditional methods. 3D printing is now becoming more affordable for consumers and small businesses. The process begins with making a 3D model through a modeling software or scanning an object. Then in a process known as fused deposition modeling the object is printed using an extruder and a continuous filament of a thermoplastic material. The plastic is added layer by layer allowing for the production of very complex shapes or geometries.

Tech Kits

Tech Kits are part of the walk-in service provided by OPIM Innovate. There are three levels of difficulty meant for different users and their experience with the different technologies. Many of the Tech Kits build off each other as you progress.

Beginner

Introducing 3D Printing with a 3D Printing Pen

Length: 30-60 Minutes

Description: 3D printing is an additive manufacturing process that involves the layering of heated plastic to form solid printed parts. A 3D printing pen extrudes heated plastic filament from the pen’s nozzle to make possible the drawing of raised graphics on any flat surface. The pen’s ability to draw in mid-air allows the user to instantly form tangible 3D structures.

Intermediate

3D Printing with Makerbot Z18

Length: 30-60 Minutes

Description: Fused deposition modeling is the process by which the MakerBot Z18 makes solid, three-dimensional objects out of layered melted filament. To do this, 3D design files are converted into instructions for the MakerBot Replicator Z18 and then transferred to the MakerBot Z18 via USB drive. The innovative process allows models of a variety of shapes and sizes to be produced quickly and inexpensively. This tech kit teaches users the basic steps required to 3D print an STL file using a Makerbot Z18.

Advanced

3D Printing with Prusa i3

Length: 30-60 Minutes

Description: “Slicer” refers to the division of the model into individual material layers or 'slices'. Slicer software allows the user complete control over every aspect of a 3D print. This includes, but is not limited to, the material, orientation, layer height, supports, and infill of the model. The 3D printer receives this information in the form of a gcode. The gcode tells the 3D printer everything necessary to print an object with the user-selected settings to minimize the chance of a print failure. This tech kit teaches users the steps required to successfully 3D print on a Prusa using slicer software.

 

Resources

Maker-Bot Replicator Z18

Makerbot: Replicator Z18

Quantity: 2

Description: This 3D printer is versatile solution for users from beginners to professionals.

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Makerbot: Replicator 2x

Quantity: 1

Description: The Makerbot Replicator 2X is a desktop 3D printer that allows for complex and intricate 3D print jobs.

Prusa i3 MK3

Prusa i3 MK3+

Quantity: 1

Description: The Prusa i3 MK3+ automatic 3D printer is open source in terms of both hardware and software.

3Doodler Create+ 3D Printing Pen

3Doodler Create+ 3D Printing Pens

Quantity: 4

Description: A 3D printing pen extrudes heated plastic filament from the pen’s nozzle to make possible the drawing of raised graphics on any flat surface.

Prusa Slicer logo

Prusa Slicer

Type: Software

Description: Slicer software allows the user complete control over every aspect of a 3D print. This includes, but is not limited to, the material, orientation, layer height, supports, and infill of the model.

Makerbot Desktop logo

Makerbot Desktop

Type: Modeling Software

Description: Makerbot Desktop is a free software that allows users to smoothly upload  and prepare files for 3D prints.